Other Stories

Young Man Walks Across America to Listen, Understand

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

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In 2012, at the age of 23, Andrew Forsthoefel decided to walk 4,000 miles across America with a handmade sign

Andrew Forsthoefel sets off on his cross-country walk. By Therese Jornlin.

that said “Walking to Listen.” Along the way, he recorded dozens of stories from the people he met. Now settled in Western Massachusetts, Forsthoefel has a new book about  his journey. I joined him for a much shorter stroll to talk about his experience…. [Aired on New England Public Radio, March 2017]

To download audio, right-click here.

Auschwitz Survivor Michael Kraus (Virtually) Meets Northampton High School Students

Friday, December 2nd, 2016

Listen to Part A Here

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Listen to Part B Here

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Michael Kraus speaking by Skype to Kate Todhunter’s class. Class member Lucy Norton looks on.

Our family friend Michael Kraus, who was the only member of his immediate family to survive the Holocaust, graciously agreed to speak via Skype with teacher Kate Todhunter’s History of the Holocaust class at Northampton High School. My daughter Lucy, our friend Ari, and I drove out to Brookline to help set up the connection with Michael and his wife Ilana. He recounted his story through the war and afterwards, his decision to publish the diary he wrote just after liberation, and he answered the students’ insightful questions. It was incredibly meaningful to hear from a witness to history – and to see how someone can survive and thrive after enduring the worst humanity has to offer.

At 86, Michael – a retired architect and grandfather — is starting to slow down and feel his age, but  humor has remained intact all these years. After the class conversation, as we were eating bagels in their dining room, he admitted something we all found strangely amusing: he uses his concentration camp number, which is still tattooed on his forearm, as his computer password.

[To download audio, right-click here for Part A and here for Part B . NOT FOR BROADCAST.]

“Living Buildings” – Beautiful Concept, But Will They Save the Earth?

Friday, May 6th, 2016

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Hampshire College’s entry into the Living Building Challenge.

In the construction industry, the most eco-friendly type of building used to be LEED certified. That’s where buildings get different ratings according to how well they conserve energy and other resources. But today, there’s a higher standard — the living building — which is meant to be so green it actually leaves the environment better than it found it. Western Massachusetts may soon be one of the densest spots for this kind of project. But there are skeptics, including in the green building movement, who wonder whether pursuing such an environmental ideal, building by building, will ultimately serve the cause. [Aired on New England Public Radio, April 29, 2016]

Wrongfully Convicted (for 27 years). Then Things Get Really Unfair.

Thursday, November 12th, 2015

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Mark and Mia Schand.

In fall of 2013, Mark Schand walked out of court in Springfield, Massachusetts, a free man – after 27 years in prison for a murder he says he did not commit. Two years later, Schand is still getting his bearings. He’s living with the wife who stood by him — and is trying to find a way forward with little help from the system that locked him up. New England Public Radio’s Karen Brown reports.

To download audio, right-click  here

Shorter version aired on NPR’s Weekend Edition.

Harvard Public Health Magazine – Profiles

Monday, June 22nd, 2015

Here are links to some of the stories I’ve written for Harvard Public Health Magazine:

A Burning Passion -

http://cdn1.sph.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/60/2014/04/Winter-14-A-burning-passion.pdf

A Survivor’s Empathy -

https://cdn1.sph.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2014/09/A-Survivors-Empathy_Angela-Diaz.pdf

 

 

Voices from the Tornado

Monday, June 4th, 2012

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A montage of voices and sounds from the June 1, 2011 tornados in Western Massachusetts. I produced this as part of WFCR’s coverage of the one-year anniversary. Thanks to interns Andy Locke and Josh Ernst for production assistance.